Welcome to the Australian Ford Forums forum.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and inserts advertising. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members, respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features without post based advertising banners. Registration is simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

Please Note: All new registrations go through a manual approval queue to keep spammers out. This is checked twice each day so there will be a delay before your registration is activated.

Go Back   Australian Ford Forums > General Topics > Non Ford Related Community Forums > The Bar

The Bar For non Automotive Related Chat

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 27-07-2017, 08:47 PM   #181
steve101
Regular Member
 
steve101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 298
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

the internet in Australia is a joke we're not even in the top 50 there's 3rd world countries with faster
__________________
2014 Fg Mk2 XR6 Turbo
2005 Ba Mk2 XR6 Ute
steve101 is online now   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 28-07-2017, 12:33 AM   #182
Syndrome
I was Ford's number 1 fan
 
Syndrome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,563
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by steve101 View Post
the internet in Australia is a joke we're not even in the top 50 there's 3rd world countries with faster
I've had access to the internet at home since 1997 when connection was done via a 33.6k modem. The internet is fast enough as it is and this NBN money should be better spent on more important things.
__________________
20 year veteran of automotive industry now under-employed.
Syndrome is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
This user likes this post:
Old 28-07-2017, 10:12 AM   #183
Grunter
Not of the Sooty variety!
Donating Member3
 
Grunter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: On a Shrinking Planet
Posts: 1,779
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Syndrome View Post
I've had access to the internet at home since 1997 when connection was done via a 33.6k modem. The internet is fast enough as it is and this NBN money should be better spent on more important things.
Internet usage in 1997


Internet usage in 2017


There is a need to invest in building infrastructure that can handle not just the increased speed required (Model T vs FGX), but big enough pipes (dirt roads vs highways) to let the increased traffic flow.

However unfortunately GovCo and friends are way to focused on self interests and remaining in power and don't look at the long term benefits on building a Internet Autobahn that we want now but very much will need in the near future.

IMO
__________________
"To be afraid is to be alive - to act against that fear is to be a person of courage."


Current
The Toy: 2002 AUIII TS50
The Daily: 2015 Jeep WK2 SRT8
Grunter is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
7 users like this post:
Old 28-07-2017, 12:47 PM   #184
Syndrome
I was Ford's number 1 fan
 
Syndrome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,563
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grunter View Post
Internet usage in 1997
image

Internet usage in 2017
image

There is a need to invest in building infrastructure that can handle not just the increased speed required (Model T vs FGX), but big enough pipes (dirt roads vs highways) to let the increased traffic flow.

However unfortunately GovCo and friends are way to focused on self interests and remaining in power and don't look at the long term benefits on building a Internet Autobahn that we want now but very much will need in the near future.

IMO
Well my first experience with the NBN is that it is a white elephant. My speeds are actually SLOWER now than before. I was getting into the low 30Mbps before NBN, now I am in the low 20Mbps on NBN.
__________________
20 year veteran of automotive industry now under-employed.
Syndrome is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
This user likes this post:
Old 28-07-2017, 01:12 PM   #185
Grunter
Not of the Sooty variety!
Donating Member3
 
Grunter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: On a Shrinking Planet
Posts: 1,779
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Syndrome View Post
Well my first experience with the NBN is that it is a white elephant. My speeds are actually SLOWER now than before. I was getting into the low 30Mbps before NBN, now I am in the low 20Mbps on NBN.
I know your pain! I had the same issues going from ADSL to NBN FTTN. Wasted a lot of my time chasing up both the ISP and NBN for reasons why and for them to sort it out. Long story short it was resolved (to a point) when the ISP finally dealt with the additional congestion in my area. Still drops from a peak of 82mb/s down to 6-8mb/s on Sunday arvos/evenings (which is still a lot better than the best on the old ADSL service).
__________________
"To be afraid is to be alive - to act against that fear is to be a person of courage."


Current
The Toy: 2002 AUIII TS50
The Daily: 2015 Jeep WK2 SRT8
Grunter is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 28-07-2017, 01:13 PM   #186
CoolBFWagon
Donating Member
Donating Member2
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 4,126
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

$80 Billion of tax payers money and its actually worse.

LUDICROUS!
__________________
LPG&LNG...The only way to GO!
CoolBFWagon is online now   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
4 users like this post:
Old 28-07-2017, 01:48 PM   #187
olfella
Cranky Old Bastard & UBP
Donating Member2
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Kenthurst
Posts: 7,980
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

I was having an online chat with a service area of one NBN service provider and they were going on about that "internet speeds indicated are maximum theoretical speeds only. Actual throughput speeds may be slower and could vary due to many factors, including the type / source of content being downloaded, hardware and software configuration, the number of users simultaneously using the network and performance of interconnecting infrastructure not operated by"

So I asked why cant the speed be taken at the point of entry by the tech doing the install - then the user can pay for the tier option that would apply from that.

No no no we cannot do that. Then they went on about upload speeds also being restricted...

Why is it so hard when really all we want as users is a nice reliable, stable service that we get what we pay for?
__________________
"But really...what can possibly go wrong"
olfella is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
3 users like this post:
Old 28-07-2017, 01:55 PM   #188
wizardy
fairmont xb hardtop
 
wizardy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: nsw
Posts: 1,028
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Just think if it was fiber optic there wouldn't be any issue.
But then they couldn't stagger costing to rip people off.
__________________
its not a crime not to know but it is a crime not to find out
wizardy is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
2 users like this post:
Old 28-07-2017, 02:00 PM   #189
Syndrome
I was Ford's number 1 fan
 
Syndrome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,563
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

As if they heard me....

http://www.news.com.au/technology/on...6fafa2e2f7db87
__________________
20 year veteran of automotive industry now under-employed.
Syndrome is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
3 users like this post:
Old 31-07-2017, 02:11 PM   #190
snowcone
Regular Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 469
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Most areas in Newcastle have received the crappiest NBN that could be delivered.
I think we were labelled as a "test area" for the "hybrid NBN"
This involved not only the lower level FTTN, but also a hybrid combination of existing copper and optical fibre.
So this worked out well - not!
My NBN is marginally faster than the ADSL1 it replaced, but still only half the speed of my ADSL2 at work.
At home it still buffers on videos.
This is pathetic and a waste of time and money, which is all we could ever have expected from a government run project.
They should have done the job properly with full fibre to all premises, not this half baked, half copper, halfway there system that is already outdated.
Makes you embarressed to be an Australian sometimes.
__________________
1940 Ford Deluxe Hotrod
1958 Ford Customline
2002 Ford Explorer

I only drive V8's
snowcone is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
This user likes this post:
Old 11-08-2017, 06:24 PM   #191
Syndrome
I was Ford's number 1 fan
 
Syndrome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,563
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

A new issue discovered. The NBN has locked telephone override numbers. For example if I am with Telstra, I could previously use a override number if I wanted a call to be charged to another company (e.g. Veetel). With NBN this no longer possible. You sign a contract with one of the ISPs and you are locked in with them for 100% of the IT and telecommunication services. Thanks Krudd.
__________________
20 year veteran of automotive industry now under-employed.
Syndrome is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 11-08-2017, 10:55 PM   #192
karj
XY Falcon
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 412
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Syndrome View Post
A new issue discovered. The NBN has locked telephone override numbers. For example if I am with Telstra, I could previously use a override number if I wanted a call to be charged to another company (e.g. Veetel).With NBN this no longer possible. You sign a contract with one of the ISPs and you are locked in with them for 100% of the IT and telecommunication services. Thanks Krudd.
Don't know who told you that, but it's wrong.

Phone services under NBN utilise VoIP, so you are free to port your number to any VoIP provider you wish, regardless of your choice of RSP. You may need to purchase and configure an ATA though (eg: Cisco SPA112).

To be honest though, I'm not a huge fan of VoIP (for a number of reasons). I would have preferred the original FTTH model utilising a UNI-V port for phone service. But we can't have that anymore under the multi-technology mix NBN... And the blame for that does not lie with Krudd.
__________________
_________________
1971 XY Falcon 500

Last edited by karj; 11-08-2017 at 11:04 PM. Reason: formatting
karj is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 11-08-2017, 11:44 PM   #193
Squalo
Two Wheels Good
 
Squalo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Palmwoods, Sunshine Coast QLD
Posts: 693
Tech Writer: Recognition for the technical writers of AFF - Issue reason: Writing tech article(s) 
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Yeah I was wondering about the Rudd thing. The original Labor NBN FTTP model actually allowed for multiple providers.
__________________
2004 SX TX RWD Territory
1994 GQ DX TD42 Patrol
1969 Kombi
Squalo is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 11-08-2017, 11:59 PM   #194
Syndrome
I was Ford's number 1 fan
 
Syndrome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,563
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by karj View Post
Don't know who told you that, but it's wrong.
Who told me? Veetel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by karj View Post
Phone services under NBN utilise VoIP, so you are free to port your number to any VoIP provider you wish, regardless of your choice of RSP. You may need to purchase and configure an ATA though (eg: Cisco SPA112).
Tell me that in layman terms.

Quote:
Originally Posted by karj View Post
To be honest though, I'm not a huge fan of VoIP (for a number of reasons). I would have preferred the original FTTH model utilising a UNI-V port for phone service. But we can't have that anymore under the multi-technology mix NBN... And the blame for that does not lie with Krudd.
What are the issues with VoIP?
__________________
20 year veteran of automotive industry now under-employed.
Syndrome is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 12-08-2017, 01:52 AM   #195
karj
XY Falcon
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 412
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Syndrome View Post
Who told me? Veetel.
I don't know anything about Veetel, but a quick look on their website indicates that they only offer NBN phone plans on NBN FTTP (fibre to the premise).

As you have only just come onto the NBN and the Coalition halted FTTP rollout when elected in 2013, it is unlikely that you have FTTP, so it would seem you cannot get a phone service through Veetel.

Veetel look like they did offer a NBN FTTP internet and phone bundle previously, but no longer. Not that this is relevant to you anyway because you probably don't have FTTP.

You are likely to be connected to the NBN through FTTN (fibre to the node) or HFC (hybrid fibre coaxial) or FTTB (fibre to the building) or fixed wireless.

You can check what technology connects you to the NBN at this website

Quote:
Originally Posted by Syndrome View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by karj
Phone services under NBN utilise VoIP, so you are free to port your number to any VoIP provider you wish, regardless of your choice of RSP. You may need to purchase and configure an ATA though (eg: Cisco SPA112).
Tell me that in layman terms.
I'll give it my best. Sorry if the following is clear as mud.

You probably used to have an analogue phone that you connected directly to a phone socket. With NBN FTTN, FTTB, HFC or fixed wireless, you can no longer do this.

Telephone services are instead delivered by VoIP (which stands for voice over internet protocol). In layman terms, you need an active internet connection to deliver the voice service.

Most RSP's (retail service providers) offer NBN internet and phone bundles. So if you opt to retain a landline phone number and port that number to your RSP, that phone service will be delivered by VoIP and they will typically supply you with a pre-configured modem/router that you plug into the wall socket, and then you plug your analogue phone into the modem/router. In this situation, your phone connects to the modem/router and the modem/router connects to internet.

If you are unhappy with the voice service provided by your RSP (eg: you may feel call costs are uncompetitive) you could choose to port your phone number to an alternative VoIP provider (eg: Telecube, MyNetFone - **these are just examples, not me recommending these providers).

If you did this, you could no longer plug your phone into the RSP's supplied modem/router because they typically do not allow customers to configure alternative VoIP providers on their supplied hardware. You would instead have to purchase an ATA (analogue telephone adapter, eg: Cisco SPA112), configure it with the settings provided to you by your alternative VoIP provider, plug your phone into the ATA, and plug the ATA into the modem/router via an ethernet cable. In this situation, your phone connects to the ATA, the ATA connects to the modem/router via ethernet, and the modem/router connects to internet.

So you would be effectively using your RSP for internet only, and a separate VoIP provider for your phone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Syndrome View Post
What are the issues with VoIP?
The things that I don't particularly like about it are:
- Emergency call routing issues depending on VoIP provider (eg: I called police assistance in SA and was routed to NSW police assistance)
- Latency/delay/echo issues
- No phone service at all in event of power outage and nothing you can do about it
- Potential QoS issues
- Requirement for an ATA, or VoIP modem/router.

These issues are either significantly minimised, or eliminated if using a UNI-V port on the NTD in Labor's original FTTP NBN rollout. With FTTP, you also had the flexibility such that if you did want to setup a VoIP provider and an ATA, you could achieve this as well through your router and NBN UNI-D connection.
__________________
_________________
1971 XY Falcon 500

Last edited by karj; 12-08-2017 at 01:58 AM.
karj is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 12-08-2017, 02:47 AM   #196
notNA
Starter Motor
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 27
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

all i'm going to do is clap very slowly.

i'm in the **** adsl 2+ speed which has been on a steady decline since i have had it...

hopefully another plastic bag in the pit along with a rubber band taken off a news paper will fix it

refuse to go to telstra and get locked into there stupid contracts
notNA is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 13-08-2017, 01:54 AM   #197
Mechan1k
Moderator
Donating Member1
 
Mechan1k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Kenthurst
Posts: 33,193
Technical Contributor: For members who share their technical expertise. - Issue reason: Always willing to help out with technical information. Valued Contributor: For members whose non technical contributions are worthy of recognition. - Issue reason: Brings a wealth of knowledge to the forums and is frequently giving helpful advice. 
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Another main issue with VOIP is people of back to base alarm systems that dial out. This function does not work once switched (in most cases ... depends on the alarm system used in the house)
Mechan1k is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 13-08-2017, 02:27 AM   #198
.:4:.
FF.Com.Au Hardcore
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: The best of the west
Posts: 2,718
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mechan1k View Post
Another main issue with VOIP is people of back to base alarm systems that dial out. This function does not work once switched (in most cases ... depends on the alarm system used in the house)
There are alarm systems that work with voip. Voice over Internet protocol has been around for long enough and systems have been developed to work with it. Just like most things, things have to be upgraded but it's do able. The old alarm socket may be kind of prehistoric but the new school has things sorted out.
__________________
Good ideas are only good if you remember them
.:4:. is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 13-08-2017, 11:42 AM   #199
Syndrome
I was Ford's number 1 fan
 
Syndrome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,563
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by karj View Post
I don't know anything about Veetel, but a quick look on their website indicates that they only offer NBN phone plans on NBN FTTP (fibre to the premise).

As you have only just come onto the NBN and the Coalition halted FTTP rollout when elected in 2013, it is unlikely that you have FTTP, so it would seem you cannot get a phone service through Veetel.

Veetel look like they did offer a NBN FTTP internet and phone bundle previously, but no longer. Not that this is relevant to you anyway because you probably don't have FTTP.

You are likely to be connected to the NBN through FTTN (fibre to the node) or HFC (hybrid fibre coaxial) or FTTB (fibre to the building) or fixed wireless.

You can check what technology connects you to the NBN at this website



I'll give it my best. Sorry if the following is clear as mud.

You probably used to have an analogue phone that you connected directly to a phone socket. With NBN FTTN, FTTB, HFC or fixed wireless, you can no longer do this.

Telephone services are instead delivered by VoIP (which stands for voice over internet protocol). In layman terms, you need an active internet connection to deliver the voice service.

Most RSP's (retail service providers) offer NBN internet and phone bundles. So if you opt to retain a landline phone number and port that number to your RSP, that phone service will be delivered by VoIP and they will typically supply you with a pre-configured modem/router that you plug into the wall socket, and then you plug your analogue phone into the modem/router. In this situation, your phone connects to the modem/router and the modem/router connects to internet.

If you are unhappy with the voice service provided by your RSP (eg: you may feel call costs are uncompetitive) you could choose to port your phone number to an alternative VoIP provider (eg: Telecube, MyNetFone - **these are just examples, not me recommending these providers).

If you did this, you could no longer plug your phone into the RSP's supplied modem/router because they typically do not allow customers to configure alternative VoIP providers on their supplied hardware. You would instead have to purchase an ATA (analogue telephone adapter, eg: Cisco SPA112), configure it with the settings provided to you by your alternative VoIP provider, plug your phone into the ATA, and plug the ATA into the modem/router via an ethernet cable. In this situation, your phone connects to the ATA, the ATA connects to the modem/router via ethernet, and the modem/router connects to internet.

So you would be effectively using your RSP for internet only, and a separate VoIP provider for your phone.



The things that I don't particularly like about it are:
- Emergency call routing issues depending on VoIP provider (eg: I called police assistance in SA and was routed to NSW police assistance)
- Latency/delay/echo issues
- No phone service at all in event of power outage and nothing you can do about it
- Potential QoS issues
- Requirement for an ATA, or VoIP modem/router.

These issues are either significantly minimised, or eliminated if using a UNI-V port on the NTD in Labor's original FTTP NBN rollout. With FTTP, you also had the flexibility such that if you did want to setup a VoIP provider and an ATA, you could achieve this as well through your router and NBN UNI-D connection.
Great response. Thanks for taking the time to type this. My internet setup prior to NBN was coaxial cable from the street to the router in the house which was only installed February 2016. Prior to that I was using ADSL2+.

It is possible to have a rational discussion and sharing of opinions on this forum. The only problem is the amount of snowflakes in society is increasing at an alarming rate. Hate to think where we will be in another 10 years with the current rate of decay.
__________________
20 year veteran of automotive industry now under-employed.
Syndrome is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 14-08-2017, 08:40 PM   #200
Falcon Coupe
Clevo Mafia Inc.
 
Falcon Coupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 8,797
Valued Contributor: For members whose non technical contributions are worthy of recognition. - Issue reason: Your tireless efforts behind the scenes in keeping AFF the place it is. Chairman's Award: Chairman's Award - Issue reason: The exceptional contribution made to AFF over an extended period of time. 
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

I have been on NBN for a week and a half now, I signed up for the 100/40 FTTN speed boost plan.

After complaining to Telstra, I was informed today I'm in an area on coexistence for 18 months. Apparently I should have been told before signing the contract for 100/40 plan. Telstra has their hands tied, changing ISP won't make a difference and the Ombudsman won't act against NBN being wholesale rather than retail.
So 10mbps it is until the coexistence is removed. I was getting 13mbps on adsl2, absolutely gutted with no recourse, thanks for nothing NBN.
Falcon Coupe is online now   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
This user likes this post:
Old 14-08-2017, 08:52 PM   #201
Syndrome
I was Ford's number 1 fan
 
Syndrome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,563
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Falcon Coupe View Post
I have been on NBN for a week and a half now, I signed up for the 100/40 FTTN speed boost plan.

After complaining to Telstra, I was informed today I'm in an area on coexistence for 18 months. Apparently I should have been told before signing the contract for 100/40 plan. Telstra has their hands tied, changing ISP won't make a difference and the Ombudsman won't act against NBN being wholesale rather than retail.
So 10mbps it is until the coexistence is removed. I was getting 13mbps on adsl2, absolutely gutted with no recourse, thanks for nothing NBN.
My suggestion to all is wait until 18 months after NBN arrives in your suburb then get it installed.
__________________
20 year veteran of automotive industry now under-employed.
Syndrome is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
This user likes this post:
Old 14-08-2017, 09:11 PM   #202
wodahs
FF.Com.Au Hardcore
 
wodahs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: perth
Posts: 2,737
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

wait 18 months after hey
I'm on the border of two suburbs the street is basically the divider same post code , my st number is the only one on the st even tho it goes ks and thru other suburbs
but back to the two suburbs thing if I put my address up with one suburb I'm getting fttc (curb) end of 2018 if I put the other up I get fttn beginning 2019
and
I put the address (only one address with the suburb my side of the st) with email updates in the site and got two emails back both stating the other
now the house is pre 80's and I have no phone line , was dug up prier to me buying 9 years ago and I was going to lay concrete where it would go so was going to lay conduit to support when it went thru
__________________
should think of selling my 02 explorer V8 now I got a new ts sz mk2 awd territory

and yes still (as money n time permit) doing the

rebuild the fairlane of thrones - zh with a clevo 400m 4v heads injected whipple blown with aode 4 speed trans to a 9" ....... we'll get there eventually
http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z...psnxbpq9kp.png

just remember don't be afraid to try something new.
Remember, amateurs built the Ark...Professionals built the Titanic!
wodahs is online now   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 14-08-2017, 09:37 PM   #203
Falcon Coupe
Clevo Mafia Inc.
 
Falcon Coupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 8,797
Valued Contributor: For members whose non technical contributions are worthy of recognition. - Issue reason: Your tireless efforts behind the scenes in keeping AFF the place it is. Chairman's Award: Chairman's Award - Issue reason: The exceptional contribution made to AFF over an extended period of time. 
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Syndrome View Post
My suggestion to all is wait until 18 months after NBN arrives in your suburb then get it installed.
Plenty close to me getting 90mbs downloads, it's node lotto and I happened to lose. 😕

If everyonme were to sign up to NBN straight away the coexistence would be removed.
Falcon Coupe is online now   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
This user likes this post:
Old 15-08-2017, 09:47 PM   #204
Junkyard-Dog
Far Quit
 
Junkyard-Dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 551
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Falcon Coupe View Post
I have been on NBN for a week and a half now, I signed up for the 100/40 FTTN speed boost plan.

After complaining to Telstra, I was informed today I'm in an area on coexistence for 18 months. Apparently I should have been told before signing the contract for 100/40 plan. Telstra has their hands tied, changing ISP won't make a difference and the Ombudsman won't act against NBN being wholesale rather than retail.
So 10mbps it is until the coexistence is removed. I was getting 13mbps on adsl2, absolutely gutted with no recourse, thanks for nothing NBN.
Yep, I also get 13mbps on adsl2 and even though I want to go faster, stories like this are keeping me on this plan.
Junkyard-Dog is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
This user likes this post:
Old 15-08-2017, 10:44 PM   #205
NTF6
FF.Com.Au Hardcore
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Desert City
Posts: 1,492
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Syndrome View Post
My suggestion to all is wait until 18 months after NBN arrives in your suburb then get it installed.


Why?
I was one of the very first in my suburb and I've had the benefit of great speed and low congestion for about two years now. Why be one of the last to get onboard only to get lower speeds.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
__________________
2014 Kinetic F6
NTF6 is offline   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Old 15-08-2017, 11:01 PM   #206
Franco Cozzo
Brunswick and Footscray
Donating Member3
 
Franco Cozzo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Kentry Victoria
Posts: 31,744
Default Re: NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) - What does it mean to us?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Falcon Coupe View Post
Plenty close to me getting 90mbs downloads, it's node lotto and I happened to lose. 😕

If everyonme were to sign up to NBN straight away the coexistence would be removed.
I'm one of the first on NBN here in my street and no issues I'm on the 100/40 plan?
__________________

Go Team QLD!

1987 XF Falcon Taxi
Smegma Yellow
5.7L LS1

Team NSW:

GAY U Wagon
Mardi Gras Silver
Limp wristed 302 wheezer

Just say NO to the AU!
Franco Cozzo is online now   Reply With Quote Multi-Quote with this Post
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +11. The time now is 03:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Other than what is legally copyrighted by the respective owners, this site is copyright www.fordforums.com.au
Positive SSL